Diabetes Questions Answered


The doctors at Marion Heart Associateshave a reputation for providing the best in patient care.


The newest addition to their team, Rebecca Boone, ARNP, took time to answer some of the questions patients commonly ask about diabetes.


 


Why do I experience burning in my hands and feet?


Elevated blood glucose leads to complications over time. All organs are affected as well as the vascular and nervous system. Neuropathy may be the cause of these symptoms. Your health care provider may use a number of tests to determine the cause, including review of patient blood glucose log, labs, a physical assessment, monofilament test, nerve conduction test or vascular studies.

What is the next step after testing?


Test results will determine the treatment needed. Often, we will educate the patient and his or her family on diet and exercise. We may prescribe or adjust medications and decide on a follow-up plan, which can be re-evaluated at future visits. Any abnormal nerve or vascular studies will be reviewed, and a treatment plan will be recommended, which may include medications or interventions by a doctor specializing in treatment of vascular disease.

Why would I need treatment to arteries or veins?


A burning sensation in the extremities, while often related to diabetes, can be caused by insufficiency in veins and arteries. Treatment typically alleviates or at least lessens the symptoms.

What can I do to prevent symptoms and complications?


Control your blood glucose. Partake in preventive maintenance such as an annual diabetic eye exam, daily feet check to evaluate for sores that may develop but are not noticed due to neuropathy, maintain a healthy diet, exercise and be proactive and involved in your own health.

Is it possible to develop neuropathy even if blood glucose is under control?


Unfortunately, the answer is yes. But, keeping blood glucose in control helps decrease severity and minimize the majority of complications that may occur, such as neuropathy, kidney disease, diabetic retinopathy (eye disease), heart disease, strokes and a variety of other complications.

Who is responsible for controlling my blood glucose and preventing complications?


The most important person responsible is you, the patient, followed by your health care provider as well as other members of the team who may include an endocrinologist, dietician or nutritionist, ophthalmologist, podiatrist, fitness coach and family. Most importantly, patients must be active, interactive and involved in their own care; inform his or her provider when questions or concerns arise; and get treatment before complications become an issue.

Come see me today,


Rebecca Boone ARNP, FNP-C


Marion Heart Associates and


Marion Internal Medicine Associates


New Location:


7578 SW Maricamp Rd., Suite #102


Phone: (352) 680-0257


Fax: (352) 680-0256


marionheartassociates.com


Hours: 8am-5pm, Monday-Thursday


8am-2pm, Friday

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